Events

Date: 09/02/18 to 16/09/18
Venue: Museum of Natural History, Parks Road, Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX1 3PW

From the arrival of the earliest modern humans to the people of the present day, Settlers tells the dynamic story of Britain’s ever-changing population as revealed by genetics, archaeology and demography. The exhibition is accompanied by newly commissioned artwork by visual artist Ian Kirkpatrick, and a special events programme.

Date: 28/03/18 to 30/06/18
Venue: Museum of Natural History, Parks Road, Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX1 3PW

New works by our community of artists, all inspired by the Museum’s Life Collections.

Date: 01/05/18 to 01/07/18
Venue: Museum of Natural History, Parks Road, Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX1 3PW

New works by our community of artists, all
inspired by the Museum’s Life Collections. A small display in our Community Case.

Date: 02/05/18 to 03/07/18
Venue: Museum of Natural History, Parks Road, Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX1 3PW

Argonauts, or paper nautiluses, are known
for their beautiful shells, but how are they
formed? Find out and see specimens from
the collections in this small display in our Presenting series.

Date: 18/05/18 to 31/12/18
Venue: Museum of the History of Science, Broad Street, Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX1 3AZ

100 years ago, the first group of women won the right to vote in the UK. In this centenary year, there is widespread recognition of the political role women have played in society.But what about the vital contributions women have made to science over the centuries? For 2018 the Museum will be celebrating women throughout history who have contributed to our knowledge of the universe.Portrait Display - From March 2018 This display celebrates women who have been part of the scientific world, from the 1700s to the present day. Each scientific woman is linked to the Museum, either through an item in the collections or by their roles at the University of Oxford. It includes Sarah Angelina Acland, who was a pioneer of colour photography in the late 1800s and early 1900s, and Mary Somerville, who was known as “The Queen of Nineteenth Century Science”.Family Trail - From March 2018 Women have been involved in science for thousands of years as astronomers, mathematicians, instrument makers, and merchants. Use this family trail to travel through our collections and find out about women like Caroline Herschel, an astronomer, and Ada Lovelace, a forerunner of computer coding. Drop-in, ages 7+In the Archives - From June 2018 A display of rarely seen material from the Museum’s archive featuring Sarah Acland, Elizabeth Hippisley and more.Shout Out For Women Trail - From July 2018 This trail across the collections of Oxford University’s Gardens, Libraries and Museums aims to highlight just some of the incredible women who are represented within our wonderful collections and buildings, from artists and scientists to curators.

Date: 23/06/18
Venue: Pitt Rivers Museum, South Parks Road, Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX1 3PP

The Pitt Rivers Museum cares for a sail from an umiak, or women's boat, collected from an Inuit group in the Hudson Strait in 1824. The sail is unique is that it is made from strips of dried intestine, sewn together to make a large square sail - it is the only known example in a museum collection. Due to the size of the object and the very fragile material, it is not possible for the object to be on long-term display. Creating a rare opportunity for our visitors to see this important and fascinating object, the Conservation team have retrieved the sail from the stores and will have it out on display for several days in June. They will be on hand to talk about this special material and the work they have carried out to preserve this unique artefact. Talks at 11.00, 12.00, 13.00, 14.30 & 15.30.

Date: 23/06/18
Venue: Pitt Rivers Museum, South Parks Road, Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX1 3PP

Go behind the scenes at our annual day-festival and get close up with objects to find out about fascinating research taking place at Pitt Rivers Museum. Take part in hands-on activities to uncover unexpected research partnerships. Learn about cutting-edge conservation techniques. Delve into the photographic/sound archives to find out about the Zande, Nuer and Anuak peoples of South Sudan; view a rare and little-seen umiak sail made from walrus intestine & talk to the Calais Jungle curators behind 'Architectures of Displacement', an activity to mark Refugee Week 2018.

Date: 23/06/18
Venue: Museum of Natural History, Parks Road, Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX1 3PW

Find out about the latest research in an
afternoon talk based on themes explored in
the Settlers exhibition.

Date: 25/06/18 to 08/01/19
Venue: Museum of Natural History, Parks Road, Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX1 3PW

Wytham Woods’ studies of UK bat populations offer a unique insight into our often misunderstood ‘night dwellers’. A new display in the Museum's Wytham Room.

Date: 25/06/18
Venue: The Weston Library, Broad Street, Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX1 3BG

Maria Sibylla Merian was one of the first naturalists to make careful observations of the metamorphosis of insects and amphibians, at a time when little was known about it. Her detailed illustrations were not only unusual in the 17th century but extraordinary. Her bold decision to set sail for Surinam in South America to record and draw unusual plants and animals culminated in the publication in 1705 of 'Metamorphosis Insectorum Surinamensium', her magnum opus. Her delicate illustrations were brilliantly coloured, and her notes remarkable for their scientific detail, considering that she worked with only paint-brush and magnifying glass.

Jeyaraney Kathirithamby was a Rhodes Visiting Fellow and co-authored 'Greek Insects'(Duckworth) with her husband Malcolm Davies, and 'Maria Sibylla Merian, Artist, Scientist and Adventurer' (Getty) with Sarah Pomeroy

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